This guide is intended for district and council volunteers and staff to use when planning and executing district and council events.

An event’s success is often dependent on the ability of all involved to communicate clearly and work together.  This Event and Activity Guide is designed to be a working tool to help both volunteers and professionals alike.  The steps outlined here define roles and outline the tasks necessary to ensure success.  The guidelines here include both requirements (bold italic) and suggestions.

“If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”

Volunteer Chair

The role of the Volunteer Chair is to plan, organize, promote, and marshal all the resources necessary to run the event.  These responsibilities include:

  • Select, recruit, and train key staff (including providing job descriptions / expectations, staff recognition, and follow up to see that jobs are being completed)
    • Some positions require next level approval – consult Scouting Professional
  • Preside at event staff meetings
  • Oversee, with Scouting Professional, the overall event details (e.g., location, date, budget, timeline, theme, program, patches, t-shirts, registration forms/event fliers, promotion, facilities)
  • Complete the event diary and post-event evaluation (How did we do? Did we stay within our budget? What went well?, What went wrong? What can we do better and how?, Who might make a good chair for next year?)
  • Reporting progress (District Committee, Scouting Professional, others depending upon event / activity)
  • Writing thank you notes
  • Preside and contribute to event Wrap-Up meeting

Scouting Professional

The Scouting Professional’s role (serving as District Executive or Staff Advisor) is to advise, assist, and sometimes approve, especially in the areas of scheduling, budgeting, and coordinating the resources of the Greater Tampa Bay Area Council.  Expectations:

  • Working with the Event Chair:
    • Determine Scope and Purpose – Does Event Align with Council and District Goals?
    • Establish Attendance Goal and Target Audience
    • Design and Gain Approval of Event Budget
  • Responsible for Collection and Distribution of Funds (registration and payment of expenses)
    • ALL revenue must be entered into the accounting system of the Council Office, and any expenses paid out of the accounting system of the Council Office
    • Must approve all expenses before purchases are made
  • Must approve location and site for all activities outside of Council properties
    • ONLY a Scouting Professional may enter into an agreement on behalf of a District or Council
  • Responsible for properly Backdating the tasks required for a successful event
  • Should be present during the event, establishing a schedule with the Event Chair for times when attendance during the event is not possible due to other obligations
    • Is always available by phone during the event when not present
  • Is not responsible for a specific program area so that they are free to respond to needs
  • Attend and help guide event Wrap-Up meeting following event

Step 1: Goal Setting

For an event to be successful, goals must be established.  We want to define what success for an event looks like.

Attendance: Every event should have an attendance goal and a target audience.  Who you want to attend is as important as how many.  This will help focus marketing and promotion.

Program:  A program goal can be thought of as the answer to the question: “Why are we doing this event?”  Program goals help to keep focus on the purpose of the event.  Limit program goals to three or less; any more starts to get too complicated and spreads resources and attention too thin.  Your program goal gives you something to measure all other tasks against.

Financial:  Processing registrations and fees for an event are important services provided by the Greater Tampa Bay Area Council staff.  This allows volunteers to focus on program and not administration.  Every activity with expenses must have income in the form of activity fees.  A budget for any event must be developed by the Volunteer Chair and the Scouting Professional.  Budgets must have second level approval of a Field Director or the Director of Field Service before registration and promotion may begin.  Budgets for events must be submitted in July for the following calendar year because they are part of the overall Council Budget.  Unbudgeted events are not allowed.

Training Events:  It is not required that events for basic training generate excess revenue (money left over after all expenses are paid).  If one of these trainings involves extra expenses, such as food or recognition items, then a fee is expected to cover these expenses.  Trainings that fall into this category: Position Specific Training, BALOO, Outdoor Leader Skills for Webelos Leaders, IOLS, District Committee training, or other BSA training provided at the district level.  The “trained” patch and training cards are provided by the council.

Step 2: Logistics

Logistics involves the time, date, and location of an event, as well as the resources needed to support that event.  The availability of a location is a factor when scheduling the time and date. Remember, “the early bird catches the worm.”

Location: Every activity site must be approved by the District Executive or Staff Advisor BEFORE any agreement can be made.  Once the location is approved, the District Executive or Staff Advisor must be the one to sign any contractual agreement.  Only a Scouting professional can enter into an agreement on behalf of the council.  When securing a location, it is important to speak to both the person authorized to make decisions and the person who will be on-site during the event. This ensures that everyone understands the conditions of the agreement.

Date:  Look at other calendars in addition to the council calendar before proposing a date.  School calendars, community calendars and religious holidays are all important considerations.  Check with council camping before planning to hold an event at any council camp property.   Make sure you have time to develop a budget, gain budget approval, promote and make all other necessary arrangements for any event date you have in mind.

Time:  Think about how long the event is going to last and the best time to begin.  Allowing travel time is important, especially when expecting participants from the far side of the council from the event.

Step 3: Backdating

Backdating is a method used by the Boy Scouts of America to plan and organize events.  This method takes the action items necessary for success and places them in chronological order, providing a deadline for completion of each task.  This process helps avoid missed promotion opportunities important to success.  Scouting Professionals can provide a backdating schedule.

Step 4: Budget

Each event that brings in or spends money must have a budget.  The budget should be developed by the Chair and Scouting Professional.  The budget must be approved by the Scouting Professional / Event Staff Advisor, and requires next level approval by the responsible Professional Staff Leader (such as Field Director).  Promotion and registration will not begin, and fliers will not be produced or distributed until an approved budget is in place.

 Building a budget starts with listing expected expenses, using estimated costs that could be a little higher to be conservative.  Once all expenses are totaled, including any rentals and cleaning supplies, begin calculating the participation fee.  If the event has occurred previously, take determined what 80% of the previous attendance was and divide the expense total by this number.  All budgets must plan for a contingency fee of 15% of total revenue in the expenses and adjust the participation fee accordingly.  The Scouting Professional will provide the amount of excess revenue needed to cover other support costs that are not part of the event budget.

Step 5: PROMOTE and PROMOTE

With an approved plan and budget, it is time to get the word out!  Event Volunteers, working with the Scouting Professional should design an event flyer.  Help is available for this by contacting Katie Sheffield at katie.sheffield@scouting.org or Ward Bramlett at ward.bramlett@scouting.org.  Use this checklist <insert link> for items every flier should include, and to ensure the flyer meets requirements.

Remember, all event flyers must be approved by the District Executive or Staff Advisor who is the Scouting Professional for the event.  The Scouting Professional will submit the flyer to the Director of Marketing and Special Events for final approval.  Only flyers for budgeted events, with reservations (if using Council property) and established online registration information will be approved.

Distribute promotional fliers at roundtable, district trainings, and district events.

Event fliers are to be one-page only and should include the date, time, location, a general event description and the event webpage URL for additional details.  Use the flyer checklist <insert link>.

In Step 1, you identified who you expect to addend your event.  NOW it is time to market directly to them.  A detailed plan, and executing that plan is crucial to reaching your target audience.  The most successful plan puts the exciting and critical information about your event in front of your audience at least 5 to 7 times.  Direct mailing (email to save on cost), inclusion in district / council email reminders, Roundtable promotion, unit visitations, websites, social media, phone calls, and personal contacts are all effective promotion strategies.  Don’t just use one…use them all!

All details about district events (e.g., what to bring, program, rules, schedule, contact info) are to be posted on the District Webpage of the Council Website (not as a downloadable document or printed and distributed to leaders) for the following reasons:

  • Saves trees
  • Decreases the possibility of inconsistent messages distributed in printed guides vs. posted on the event webpage
  • Drives target audience to one consistent place
  • Content is more obvious on the website when a document doesn’t have to be downloaded, especially for parents
  • Friendlier web navigation for desktop and mobile users
  • Speeds up access to information for users (documents don’t have to be downloaded)
  • Allows for making updates quicker/easier – Scouting Professional can coordinate change with website administrator
  • Avoids the “I didn’t see the document” excuse since the information on the site is always available

Step 6: Recruit Staff / Committee

Don’t do it alone!  District committees can help identify volunteers.  The Commissioner Staff and Unit Leaders can provide leads as well.  For council level events, members of the Council Program Committee can often help; utilize the event Scouting Professional serving as the Staff Advisor to assist with contacts as needed.  Volunteers looking to engage community leaders can work with their District Executive or Staff Advisor for networking opportunities.

Typically, event staff is needed for logistics, program, food, health and safety, and backup staff to assist.  The Scouting Professional serves as the finance chair for the event.

Remember that Council Events (All Training, Special Events, and Program) require prospective volunteers to be approved.  Please gain approval prior to recruiting a volunteer for a position.  The Scouting Professional will present the list of prospective event volunteers for approval.

Step 7: The Event

During the event, the Chair and Scouting Professional (District Executive or Staff Advisor) should not have responsibilities for a specific task.  They are responsible for surveying the event by visiting program areas and ensuring a quality experience for participants.  Notes should be taken about things that are great and not-so-great.

Step 8: Wrap-Up

After the event, a formal wrap-up meeting occurs.  This meeting involves as many members of the event team as possible.  The Scouting Professional takes notes about what to continue and what to improve.  Wrap-up notes will be included in the event folder.

Once complete, the Scouting Professional and Chair work together to complete a physical notebook or electronic file with all relevant event information: record of staff members, copies of vendor invoices and purchase orders, the event flyer, event specifics from the website, final budget reflecting actual activity, and notes from the Wrap-Up.

The Scouting Professional is responsible for closing out the budget within 30 days of the last day of the event.  See Purchasing for Events for more guidance about policies on reimbursing volunteers for their out-of-pocket purchases for events.

Revenue and Field Receipts

The Event Chair and Scouting Professional are responsible for all expenditures and income:

  • All income must go directly to the council office and be receipted to the appropriate account. Registration fees and event account numbers need to appear on all registration forms for the event. Only council accounts are permitted. District bank account, savings accounts or slush funds are not permitted. Field receipts (available from the Scouting Professional) must be issued when taking in monies for an event outside of registrations paid through the council online registration system which provides an email receipt instead.
  • Reimbursement of expenses with cash received at an event is not permitted
  • The district executive is responsible for turning in all event revenues and allocating it to the proper account

Purchasing / Expenses

Total expenses may not exceed the budget. Variations from the budget including changes in pricing must be approved by the Scouting Professional. Variations will only be approved if participation, therefore income, goes up. Taking into consideration the actual attendance, the expenses budgeted on each line item should not be exceeded. If participation decreases, a revised budget should reflect an adjustment downward accordingly.

  • Preferred Method of Making Purchases: Purchase Orders, originated by the Scouting Professional and issued out of the accounting system of the Council Office are the preferred method of making purchases
  • Secondary Method of Making Purchases: Scouting Professionals must be consulted; they have access to other purchasing methods should a Purchase Order not be an option for a given vendor and must be consulted
  • Cash Advances: The Scouting Professional may request a cash advance in some circumstances.  Cash advances require Staff Leader approval.
  • Sales Tax: GTBAC is a section 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and thereby exempt from paying sales tax. Tax exemption can be claimed by presenting a Florida State Sales Tax exemption certificate (available to the Event Chair from the Scouting Professional). Discuss the issue of our 501(c)(3) status with all vendors considered for materials. (The GTBAC tax exemption does not apply to units)
  • Reimbursements: Purchasing done directly by volunteers is highly discouraged, and purchases made without written approval from the Scouting Professional for the event may not be reimbursed.  Receipts for approved expenses must be provided to the Scouting Professional within 2 weeks of the end of an event to be considered for reimbursement.  Once an event is closed out (30 days from the last day of the event) reimbursement will not be issued and the purchase will be considered a donation.
  • The Event Chair and Scouting Professional must inform the event staff about budgetary limits and restrictions. Those approved to purchase event supplies will be informed exactly how much has been budgeted for each area or item. All purchases should be coordinated through the event chair since various areas may require identical items that could be shared to avoid excess materials. Since actual costs may vary from the budgeted amount it is understood that small variances are likely, but substantial variances require a budget adjustment. If one budget item costs more than the budgeted amount, another item will have to cost less. Event chairs must ensure that all event staff purchasing supplies remain within their budget limits. All expenditures must have a vendor issued original receipt.
  • When ordering items, look for the best values (ask other districts, previous event chairs or at council coordinated meetings) and work within the parameters of budget (must justify costs).
  • BSA License: Only use licensed vendors to purchase items such as patches and t-shirts with BSA trademarks (e.g., fleur-de-lis) or that represent the council, district or BSA. Visit www.bsalicensing.org for more information.

Program Areas Requiring Special Reservation

The camp reservation system and the event registration system are different so for a council event at a camp property you must have the information in both systems.  To reserve a council camp for an event, the Scouting Professional will need to contact the Director of Camping to have the reservation added to the system.  To reserve camp properties for an event the Scouting Professional must have the following

  • An approved budget with project code
  • The camp and date(s) you are requesting
  • The projected number of youth participants
  • The projected number of adult participants
  • Contact information for the reservation to include contact name, email and phone number
  • The specific campsites and program areas in the camp you are requesting.
  • Acknowledgement there is a plan to staff all requested areas with properly trained personnel.

To allow as much access as possible for our units, district and council events will be restricted to the areas they require and the number of campsites they need for the number of participants.  Full camp reservations will only be allowed for large events.

 Units can make reservations up to 12 months in advance, so it is recommended that events scheduled at camps be reserved 18 months in advance. 

Online Registration through Calendar Building

During the annual calendar building process of the Greater Tampa Area Council, property reservations and online registration information will be collected for planned events with approved budgets.  We highly discourage newly created events outside of this process.

Online Registration Requirements

We want to keep the online registration process as simple as possible.  While we are able to accommodate multiple pricing structures.  Offering too many options becomes confusing for potential participants.  Click here for an online registration questionnaire.

Before it will be made active, online registration must:

  • Be approved by the Scouting Professional for the event (District Executive / Staff Advisor)
  • Have an approved budget for the event.
  • Have finalized reservations for any Council properties to be used during the event that are in the online reservation system. Your Scouting Professional can verify your reservation for Council Properties.

The purpose of the Boy Scouts of America’s National Camp Accreditation Program (NCAP) is to help councils elevate camps to new levels of excellence in delivering Scouting’s promise to youth. Councils will engage in a rigorous review of camps and properties, continuous improvement, and correction or elimination of substandard practices.

Beginning in 2020, any overnight district or council must have an NCAP assessment from the local council assessment team.  This is required for all district and council overnight events and day camps occurring at ANY location – this includes council camps and other properties.  The NCAP assessment is in addition to the requirements to follow the Guide to Safe Scouting and all council program area requirements.

Your Scouting Professional will be able to provide you with the contact information for the NCAP Chair to coordinate this effort.  For more details about NCAP, please view this website:  https://www.scouting.org/outdoor-programs/camp-accreditation/.

For events at Council Properties, most of the standards are covered through the yearly camp assessment, so please contact the NCAP Chair for what you will need to provide.  This will save you a lot of time.

Points of Note:

  • Any plan to use a program area for something other than its common use or any new programs require a risk assessment and approval from the Council Risk Management Committee. These require a long timeline (3-6 months) so should be planned early
  • The current standards are available for download from https://www.scouting.org/outdoor-programs/camp-accreditation/.
    • The standards are updated yearly in January.
    • Scroll down the page for Standards at a Glance for the type of camp. It provides a downloadable checklist.
  • Overnight events spanning 1-2 nights are classified as Family Camps.
  • Overnight events longer than 2 nights are classified as Resident Camps.
  • Remember to contact the NCAP chair before you start going through the NCAP process:
    • For council properties most of the assessment materials are already collected.
    • The NCAP chair has helpful tips and hints.
    • The chair needs to schedule your assessment.

Council and District Alignment for New Events

So that we may best serve our membership and the community, we have these guidelines for establishing a new event:

  • The best time to decide to have a new event is before the end of August in the year prior to when the event will occur
    • Allows for proper budgeting of the event
    • Allows for required time to develop and promote the event
    • Provides time to reserve any Council properties or resources in an already crowded calendar
  • The Scouting Professional must be involved in the creation of any new event
    • See Responsibilities of the Scouting Professional
  • If a new event is proposed in the same year as the event will occur, extra approvals are required to ensure success and fiscal responsibility:
    • Description of the event – What is the Purpose, Target Participants, Expected Number of Participants, Proposed Venue, Proposed Budget, Estimated Volunteers Needed
  • Approval for District Events must be given by the Field Director for the area
  • Approval for Council Events must be given by the Director of Field Service or Scout Executive
  • As stated in Setting up Online Registration for Events, online registration for an event will not be active unless approvals are gained
  • No promotion, further planning or recruiting of volunteers should be done before approval is gained

Event Staffing

There are more duties than titles and there are plenty of jobs to go around. You must determine how the responsibly is to be divided and to communicate the job descriptions. Decide what tasks need to be accomplished and make sure every detail is clearly understood. Be mindful of those who guard their turf. Remember that everyone must be current in their youth protection training.  Here are some examples of key staff positions and sample job descriptions:

Position Descriptions

Volunteer Chair:  The role of the Volunteer Chair is to plan, organize, promote, and marshal all the resources necessary to run the event.  These responsibilities include:

  • Select, recruit, and train key staff (including providing job descriptions / expectations, staff recognition, and follow up to see that jobs are being completed)
    • Some positions require next level approval – consult Scouting Professional
  • Preside at event staff meetings
  • Oversee, with Scouting Professional, the overall event details (e.g., location, date, budget, timeline, theme, program, patches, t-shirts, registration forms/event fliers, promotion, facilities)
  • Complete the event diary and post-event evaluation (How did we do? Did we stay within our budget? What went well?, What went wrong? What can we do better and how?, Who might make a good chair for next year?)
  • Reporting progress (District Committee, Scouting Professional, others depending upon event / activity)
  • Writing thank you notes
  • Preside and contribute to event Wrap-Up meeting

Scouting Professional:  The Scouting Professional’s role (serving as District Executive or Staff Advisor) is to advise, assist, and sometimes approve, especially in the areas of scheduling, budgeting, and coordinating the resources of the Greater Tampa Bay Area Council.  Expectations:

  • Working with the Event Chair:
    • Determine Scope and Purpose – Does Event Align with Council and District Goals?
    • Establish Attendance Goal and Target Audience
    • Design and Gain Approval of Event Budget
  • Responsible for Collection and Distribution of Funds (registration and payment of expenses)
    • ALL revenue must be entered into the accounting system of the Council Office, and any expenses paid out of the accounting system of the Council Office
    • Must approve all expenses before purchases are made
  • Must approve location and site for all activities outside of Council properties
    • ONLY a Scouting Professional may enter into an agreement on behalf of a District or Council
  • Responsible for properly Backdating the tasks required for a successful event
  • Should be present during the event, establishing a schedule with the Event Chair for times when attendance during the event is not possible due to other obligations
    • Is always available by phone during the event when not present
  • Is not responsible for a specific program area so that they are free to respond to needs
  • Attend and help guide event Wrap-Up meeting following event

Assistant Director: Works closely with the event chair

  • Assists the chair with all tasks
  • Promotes the event
  • Ensures safety and BSA policies

Program Director:  Works with the Chair and Scouting Professional to plan and schedule program activities for the event

  • Recruits volunteers/units (also District Commissioners and District Committee Members) to help run events
  • Knows the Scout advancement program
  • Frequently checks on volunteers to see that agreed upon assignments are being carried out
  • Helps to gather supplies
  • Ensures that all program activities have all needed supplies
  • Works with facilities director / Ranger on the location of each activity
  • Promotes the event
  • Ensures safety and BSA policy

Business Manager:  Works closely with the Scouting Professional

  • Helps facilitate requests for purchases
  • Requests bids from vendors
  • Keeps records of expenses
  • Promotes the event
  • Ensures BSA policies are followed

Registration:  Works closely with Chair, Program Chair and Scouting Professional

  • Keeps key staff notified of registration numbers
  • Recruits a staff of enthusiastic volunteers to check-in/check-out Scouts
  • Sorts and passes out t-shirts and patches (when appropriate)
  • Develops event flyers with the Chair and Scouting Professional
  • Distributes and collects evaluation forms
  • Provides a lost and found box
  • Maintains a sign-in sheet for volunteers and visitors
  • Helps the event chair keep documentation for the event diary
  • Collects any onsite payments (should be minimal) with the Scouting Professional
  • Provides badges/name tags for key staff
  • Ensures that all attendees have a medical form
  • Provides Scouting Professional with a list of all attendees including unit number (so registration in BSA can be verified)
  • Provides District Commissioner with a list of units that attended (District Events)
  • Promotes the event
  • Ensures safety and adherence to BSA policy

Awards: Works closely with Program Chair, Scouting Professional and Chair

  • Develops recognition awards for the event when appropriate
  • Helps determine staff recognition
  • Orders participation ribbons (coordinates with Scouting Professional)

Campfire Program:  Works with Program Director

  • Plans Campfire Program
  • Emcees Campfire Program
  • Manages Signup for Skits and Run-Ons
  • Responsible to review and approval all skits prior to campfire
  • Responsible for sound system if needed
  • Promotes the event
  • Works to ensure the safety of participants and adheres to BSA policies

Chaplain

  • Conducts a nondenominational worship service on Sunday morning
  • Helps promote the event

Photographer

  • Photographs and videos
  • Sends photos and videos to District Communications Chair and Scouting Professional

Publicity:  Works closely with Chair and Scouting Professional

  • Distributes event fliers and Promotes at events such as Roundtable, Program Preview, trainings, district events, district committee meetings, district commissioner meetings, unit meetings
  • Works with District Communications Chair or Council Director of Marketing to involve local news agencies to cover the event
  • Submits information to district webmaster and district social media chair

Security: Works closely with event Registrar, Chair and Scouting Professional

  • Ensures safety
  • Recruits volunteers to help with parking and traffic control
  • Ensures that adequate parking is provided for staff and participants
  • Develops a system for moving cars into and leaving the parking area
  • Makes signs or cones off “no parking” areas
  • Provides instructions for unloading and reloading vehicles
  • Secures parking vests/flashlights for parking staff
  • Promotes the event
  • Ensures adherence to BSA policies

Health and Safety: Works with Scouting Professional, Event Registrar and Event Chair

  • Responsible for recruiting a Health and Safety Team if required by the size of the event
  • The health and safety team is responsible for setting up a well-equipped tent or shelter for first aid, with a large red cross flag or sign for identification
  • Responsible for securing all necessary first aid equipment
  • Records all persons treated in the First Aid Log Book
  • Takes ownership of incident reports and ensures they are provided to the Scouting Professional in a timely manner
  • Informs the Scout Executive or on-site Scouting Professional immediately of any serious injury or illness
  • Obtains fire permits (if required) and ensuring that fire safety is maintained
  • Checks the water supply, and toilet facilities
  • Arranges for temporary latrines if necessary; ensuring that toilet paper and wash water are at latrines
  • Has a vehicle available for emergencies, and ensures that safety is maintained

A key responsibility that all volunteers and professional staff share is providing an effective program that meets the needs of young people and provides the proper health and safety of everyone concerned.  It is important that we sustain the safe operation of our programs and promote continuous improvement through organizational learning. Timely and complete incident reports support analysis that is critical to identifying needed improvement of the programs offered by the Boy Scouts of America.

Events and Activities, in their leaders guide and other conspicuous locations among event details, should post the Codes of Conduct for Scouts and Scouters.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA SCOUTER CODE OF CONDUCT

On my honor, I promise to do my best to comply with this Boy Scouts of America Scouter Code of Conduct while serving in my capacity as an adult leader:

  1. I have completed or will complete my registration with the Boy Scouts of America, answering all questions truthfully and honestly.
  2. I will do my best to live up to the Scout Oath and Scout Law, obey all laws, and hold others in Scouting accountable to those standards. I will exercise sound judgment and demonstrate good leadership and use the Scouting program for its intended purpose consistent with the mission of the Boy Scouts of America.
  3. I will make the protection of youth a personal priority. I will complete and remain current with Youth Protection training requirements. I will be familiar with and follow: • BSA Youth Protection policies and guidelines, including mandatory reporting: www.scouting.org/training/youth-protection/ • The Guide to Safe Scouting: www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/gss • The Sweet Sixteen of BSA Safety: www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/gss/sweet16
  4. When transporting youth, I will obey all laws, comply with Youth Protection guidelines, and follow safe driving practices.
  5. I will respect and abide by the Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America, BSA policies, and BSA-provided training, including but not limited to those relating to: • Unauthorized fundraising activities • Advocacy on social and political issues, including prohibited use of the BSA uniform and brand • Bullying, hazing, harassment, and unlawful discrimination of any kind
  6. I will not discuss or engage in any form of sexual conduct while engaged in Scouting activities. I will refer youth with questions regarding these topics to talk to their parents or spiritual advisor.
  7. I confirm that I have fully disclosed and will disclose in the future any of the following: • Any criminal suspicion, charges, or convictions of a crime or offense involving abuse, violence, sexual misconduct, or any misconduct involving minors or juveniles • Any investigation or court order involving domestic violence, child abuse, or similar matter • Any criminal charges or convictions for offenses involving controlled substances, driving while intoxicated, firearms, or dangerous weapons
  8. I will not possess, distribute, transport, consume, or use any of the following items prohibited by law or in violation of any Scouting rules, regulations, and policies: • Alcoholic beverages or controlled substances, including marijuana • Concealed or unconcealed firearms, fireworks, or explosives • Pornography or materials containing words or images inconsistent with Scouting values
  9. If I am taking prescription medications with the potential of impairing my functioning or judgment, I will not engage in activities that would put youth at risk, including driving or operating equipment.
  10. I will take steps to prevent or report any violation of this code of conduct by others in connection with Scouting activities

SCOUT AND OTHER YOUTH CODE OF CONDUCT DURING DISTRICT AND COUNCIL EVENTS OF THE GREATER TAMPA BAY AREA COUNCIL

In order to provide a positive, safe, and enriching environment or all scouts; while offering opportunities for wonderful adventures; the following rules have been established:

As a participant in a Greater Tampa Bay Area Council event, I promise:

  1. I will follow the Scout Law, Scout Oath, Motto, and Outdoor Code. I will remember that these are the basis for all the following rules and should be the basis for all of my actions.
  2. I am expected to follow the posted or verbal schedule of activities and assignments specified by my unit or event leadership.
  3. I will do my best to be on time and wearing the appropriate uniform for all activities.
  4. I may not use or possess any alcoholic beverages, tobacco, or illegal drugs. If found or detected, my parent or guardian (and/or the police, if necessary) will be notified immediately.
  5. I will be quiet, and I will be in bed by the posted or announced Lights Out time for the event.
  6. No visitors will be allowed in other people’s tents from Lights Out until 8:00 A.M.
  7. Sounds that can be heard outside my tent after lights out are disrespectful and disturbing to others. Lack of compliance will be dealt with by unit leaders.
  8. I will take responsibility for any property owned by a camp, my unit, or another individual or unit that I damage.
  9. The use of profanity or abusive language will not be permitted.
  10. I will use matches and lighters only when appropriate and safe, and only if I have my Firem’n Chit.
  11. I will follow Totin’ Chip rules and regulations when using knives, saws, and axes.
  12. I will use the buddy system at all times during events and activities.

The pack, troop, crew, ship or post is primarily responsible for the behavior, safety, and welfare of all members on all camping events.  At District or Council events, as well as at BSA camps, all District/Council/camp leaders have the right and responsibility of helping and correcting any problem they encounter.  The Scouts are expected to follow the directions of those leaders as if they were their own unit’s leaders.

Have questions or feedback about this page? Last updated June 10, 2020

Please contact the page author with your feedback:

Jason Borton

Director of Camping and Scoutreach

Email | 813-624-9764