One of the overriding responsibilities of the National Council and local councils is to provide a Scouting environment that is safe, healthful, and free from accidents while being exciting, enjoyable, and helpful in developing mind and body for all participants. The policies and information below is consistent with the Boy Scouts of America’s continuing loss prevention program. The responsibility for making it work is shared by each and every Scouter.

Youth Protection

The Boy Scouts of America places the greatest importance on creating the most secure environment possible for our youth members. To maintain such an environment, the BSA developed numerous procedural and leadership selection policies and provides parents and leaders with resources for all our programs.
Cub Scouts Cub Scout
Boy Scouts Boy Scout
Venturing Venturing

Youth Protection training is required for all BSA registered volunteers and must be taken every two years. If a volunteer’s Youth Protection training record is not current at the time of recharter, the volunteer will not be re-registered.

Youth Protection Reporting Procedures for Volunteers

There are two types of Youth Protection–related reporting procedures all volunteers must follow:

  • When you witness or suspect any child has been abused or neglected—See “Mandatory Report of Child Abuse” below.
  • When you witness a violation of the BSA’s Youth Protection policies—See “Reporting Violations of BSA Youth Protection Policies” below.

Mandatory Report of Child Abuse

All persons involved in Scouting shall report to local authorities any good-faith suspicion or belief that any child is or has been physically or sexually abused, physically or emotionally neglected, exposed to any form of violence or threat, exposed to any form of sexual exploitation, including the possession, manufacture, or distribution of child pornography, online solicitation, enticement, or showing of obscene material. You may not abdicate this reporting responsibility to any other person.

Steps to Reporting Child Abuse

  • Ensure the child is in a safe environment.
  • In cases of child abuse or medical emergencies, call 911 immediately. In addition, if the suspected abuse is in the Scout’s home or family, you are required to contact the local child abuse hotline.
  • Notify Bill Davis, Scout Executive for the Greater Tampa Bay Area Council, by email or phone (727) 580-9222.

Reporting Violations of BSA Youth Protection Policies

If you think any of the BSA’s Youth Protection policies have been violated, including those described within Scouting’s Barriers to Abuse, you must notify Bill Davis, Greater Tampa Bay Area Council Scout Executive, by email or phone (727) 580-9222 so appropriate action can be taken for the safety of our Scouts.

The Sweet 16 of BSA Safety

In the continuing effort to protect participants in Scout activity, the BSA National Health and Safety Committee has developed 16 points that embody good judgment and common sense for all activities. Read More

Guide to Safe Scouting

The purpose of the Guide to Safe Scouting is to prepare adult leaders to conduct Scouting activities in a safe and prudent manner. The policies and guidelines have been established because of the real need to protect members from known hazards that have been identified through 90-plus years of experience. Limitations on certain activities should not be viewed as stumbling blocks; rather, policies and guidelines are best described as stepping-stones toward safe and enjoyable adventures.

Age Appropriate Guidelines

The National Council, BSA, publishes information to help leaders consider the appropriate risk for Scouts under their guidance during Scouting activities. Age Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities provides an at-a-glance reference to activity guidelines that are based on the mental, physical, emotional, and social maturity of youth members.

Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations provides an at-a-glance reference for the use of tools by any youth or adult.

Annual Health and Medical Record

Updated in March 2014, the Annual Health and Medical Record is completed at least annually by all participants in any Scouting activity. Please discontinue use of all previous versions. Read More

Answers to Your General Health and Safety Questions

If you have questions about anything ranging from Scouts on zip lines and pets at campouts to the Annual Health and Medical Record and insurance coverage, please review this page. Read More

Wilderness First Aid Training

Learn about the new practices that go way beyond what Scouting leaders may already know as “first aid.” Wilderness First Aid training is here, helping you cope with medical emergencies in the wild and, perhaps more importantly, to be a more effective manager in any crisis. Learn More

Managing Risk

The best way to stay safe in the outdoors is to avoid getting into trouble in the first place. That requires planning, training, leadership, good judgment, and accepting responsibility – in short, risk management. Read More

Tour and Activity Plan

BSA’s National Council has revised the process for submitting Tour and Activity Plans to utilize an online platform. This change should streamline the process and reduce the workload in local Councils, resulting in a faster response to submissions. To learn more about this new method, click here to view the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for this new approach. A video of the new procedures is also available on youtube.com. To begin completion of a Tour and Activity plan for your unit, log into myscouting.scouting.org and look in the Unit Tools section  for the Tour and Activity Plan link.

Crisis Management

No matter who you are, or how fantastic your unit may be, a crisis can strike. The most frustrating aspect of crisis management is that it strikes when you are least prepared for it. In the event of an emergency, it is very important that we follow clear and proper lines of communication. On the Crisis Management page is an outline for your use, along with contact names and phone numbers.

Emergency Preparedness

The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is pleased to partner with the Boy Scouts of America to increase the level of citizen preparedness across the country. DHS has asked the Boy Scouts of America to build upon the foundation of the Ready campaign and to help citizens across the country prepare for emergencies of all kinds. The Emergency Preparedness BSA Award is designed to emphasize a Scout’s duty to respond as an individual, then as a family member, and then as a member of a Scouting unit serving their neighborhood and community.

Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA)

The SCOUTStrong Presidential Active Lifestyle Award Challenge is designed to add activity to your life and reward you when you do! To earn the award, Scouts must meet a daily activity goal of 60 minutes at least five days a week for six out of eight weeks. For adults, the daily goal is 30 minutes, but the weekly and monthly goals remain the same. The ScoutStrong webpage has Program Materials that include Healthy Eating Goals, Program Launch Tips, an Activity Log, and the Summit SEAL Challenge Award.